Business Bits: Expansion in St. Louis & the Monday After

st-louisWith MLS announcing Portland as the League’s 18th Expansion Franchise, St. Louis appeared to be the big loser.   Since the announcement, Commissioner Garber worked hard to dispel that belief.  In an article published in the in St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Mr. Garber indicated that the League would work hard to steer investors to join Jeffrey Cooper’s bid.  We have written about Mr. Cooper’s bid before, and noted the League’s frustration with the lack of financial backing; it appears that the League is now going to work hard on Mr. Cooper’s behalf.

Mr. Cooper is a bridesmaid again, despite a solid stadium deal and a city with a strong soccer history.  With one more round of expansion scheduled for the coming years, he is running out of time to cement a team for the Gateway City.

Week one of MLS action is complete, and League wide, attendance was just OK.  Houston, Dallas and Chivas brought in about 16k, while KC and San Jose sold out their smaller parks.  Seattle was a sell out on Thursday night with more than 32k and the Galaxy brought in 18k (probably the most disappointing number of the weekend) for the Sunday game.   The Crew/Dynamo match-up of the last two Cup winners was also surprisingly lightly attended.  Dallas was higher than anticipated, but the presence of Blanco may have been a contributing factor.

The League debuted their new MLSlive features this weekend and the product seemed to work well.  For less than $20 for the season, the package is a fantastic bargain.  Direct Kick was free this weekend as part of the League’s annual preview.  With the price again at $79 for the season, this is also a great deal.  These packages do not include the games broadcast nationally on ESPN, FSC and Telefutura.  Interstingly, the local broadcasts prominently displayed advertising in the upper corners of the screens, adspace not used by EPSN2.  For the matchup on Telefutura, occassional screen advertising was present, but only for infrequent interludes.  Gildden, Nakita and Addidas were among the prominent stadium signage around the League. mls

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Business Bits: Marketing in Seattle

soundersWe’ve posted before about how Seattle seems to be doing almost everything right in the lead up to its inaugural MLS season.  The Sounders  have now upped the ante with a bit of “guerrilla marketing” around the Emerald City. Park benches, statues and more have been covered with Sounders gear. The pictures definitely are worth looking at.

Remarkably, this is all part of the Sounders’ Scarf Seattle Campaign.  The team is encouraging fans to show their support while getting some free marketing in the bargain.  Add in their oustanding billboard campaign, and the team certainly gives the appearance of doing a great job  getting the city and its fans excited about the MLS season.

Other clubs really need to “go to school” on what Seattle is doing.  While it is true that Seattle is starting from the ground level and thus can experiment a bit, the franchise is working hard to get an entire city excited about soccer.  The other teams need to take a long look at what is going on the Pacific Northwest and give some creative marketing a try.

Elsewhere, expansion talk keeps heating up, with Jeffrey Cooper, the head of the St. Louis bid, expressing confidence to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.   Since the Miami bid faltered, fans have been guessing that Portland and Vancouver are next in line for 2011.  Don’t forget St. Louis.  While the League has long been nervous about Cooper’s ability to bring big money to the table, he has a strong stadium deal already in place.

In Portland, a city commission organized to review the MLS bid gave cautious approval to Merritt Paulson’s plan to bring a team to PGE Park.  Meanwhile, in Ottawa, proponents of MLS and the CFL continue to bicker about stadiums and funding. pge

MLS to Miami? Does South Florida deserve a second chance?

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When MLS officials announced the next round of expansion, St. Louis, Montreal and even Portland were among the favorites to land the new franchises.  Passed over in the prior round of expansion, St. Louis, lead by Attorney Jeffrey Cooper, landed a stadium deal and big name investors like Albert Pujols.  Nevertheless, MLS has long had concern about Cooper’s financial stability.

When Montreal  and Atlanta dropped out of the race (leaving Portland, Ottawa and Vancouver among the possibilities) the Gateway City seemed almost guaranteed a spot for 2011.  Then a dark horse entered the race in the form world famous F.C. Barcelona.

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The Spanish powerhouse combined with Marcelo Claure and Florida International University to     submit a bid to bring MLS back to South Florida.  As MLS fans well know, the Miami Fusion entered the League as an expansion team in 1998 and were contracted just four years later.  That background, combined with South Florida’s rather weak history of supporting its teams (Florida Marlins anyone?), has lead many to scoff at any move back to the Miami area.  Add in the lack of a Soccer Specific Stadium (the team would share with the FIU Football team) and the Miami bid seems like a sure loser.

However, the leadership of MLS seems to disagree.  Apparently wowed by the glam of FC Barcelona and the billions in Claure’s pockets, the league seems eager to embrace South Florida.  Commissioner Don Garber just announced that if the Miami bid is accepted, the team would start play in 2010, a year ahead of schedule and at the same time as Philadelphia.

Count me among the unconvinced.  The “beloved” Miami Dolphins strugle to sell out their games, the Panthers are barely a blip on the Miami scene and Marlins are an annual embarassment.  Why would MLS be any different? The idea of 9,000 fans snoozing through Sunday afternoon game in 110 degree Miami August heat, is a nightmare scenario for supporters of the Leage.   MLS may love the idea of Barca dumping money into its coffers, but like Chivas before them, I see little chance of a big time soccer power adjusting to life in Major League Soccer.  League rules will not permit “Barca USA” to serve as a farm team of the parent club or as a way station for up and coming talents.  MLS should have no interest in serving as a marketing opportunity for the Spanish Giants.  As much as Barca might love the idea of selling jerseys in North America, I think the League would be far better served  taking $40 million from St. Louis and and Portland in 2011.