Around MLS: San Jose Announces Marketing Campaign

san-joseJust weeks after announcing a sponsorship deal with Amway Global, the Earthquakes have announced their 2009 marketing campaign.  The campaign will combine 4 television ads, billboards and bus advertising.  The Quakes will highlight Joe Cannon and Darren Huckerby through all of the mediums utilized by the campaign.

San Jose also announced a new radio partnership with KNBR 680/1050, a sports radio station in Northern California.  The partnership will include advertising, the production of a daily 5 minute Earthquakes report and promotional activities.  According to the press release, there will also be an increased Earthquakes’ presence on the station’s website (not yet apparent).

Local media marketing is always important.  Simply getting MLS on the radar screen of mainstream media and the denizens of sports talk radio is a significant challenge.  Seattle has done this quite well (Freddy L. was trotted out over all the local airwaves when he was signed), while the Revs have gained a foothold thanks to WEEI’s “Planet Mikey“.  Generally, however MLS teams struggle for recognition in local sports talk, so San Jose’s deal with KNBR seems like a good idea.

In stadium news, Steve Goff is reporting that DC United has narrowed its potential Maryland stadium sites to three.  According to Goff, United will submit a contract on one of the sites soon.  Goff also reports that the stadium will be planned with transit in mind.united

The sooner the stadium site is selected, the quicker the process of securing approvals and funding can begin.  As important as RFK has been to the League and U.S. Soccer, it is time for United to get its own home.

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MLS Expansion: Vancouver in 2011?

vancouverAs part of our ongoing examination of MLS expansion targets, it is now time to explore Vancouver’s bid for 2011.  Jeff Mallet, Greg Kerfoot, Stev Luczo and Steve Nash (yes that Steve Nash), are the men leading the charge to bring MLS to Vancouver in 2011.  The proposed team would play at BC Place Stadium following a renovation and in a Soccer Specific Stadium sometime thereafter.   Vancouver is already home to the Whitecaps of the USL and would add a second Canadian team to MLS.

The ownership group seems solid.  Mr. Kerfoot has long been a friend of soccer and Steve Nash adds glamour and splash to the ownership.  The owners have the money; Kerfoot is a billionare.  The Whitecaps have done well at the gate and the market is hungry for higher level soccer.   BC Place is well situated and the proposed soccer stadium is also in a solid location.

All that said, color me unconvinced.  The stadium situation is murky (there is no guarantee the sss wil be built), and BC place is not an ideal soccer venue.  More importantly, I question how much the League really wants a second Canadian franchise.  Montreal was a unique creature; both because of its rivalry with Toronto and high level support (just see the massive support Montreal got for its Champions League game).  Vancouver is way off the typical sports beaten path (just ask the Grizzilies of the NBA), and would add even more lengthy travel to the MLS season.

All that said, I think the Vancouver bid is attractive for many of the same reasons I support Portland.  The money is there, the support is there and as a “mid-size city” (for sports purposes), I think it is a good fit for MLS.  With the target date for announcing new franchises approaches, we will continue to monitor Vancouver and the rest of the bids.bc-place

MLS Portland Heating Up?

portlandLast week, we  posted about Portland’s efforts to land a Major League Soccer Franchise in 2011.  On Tuesday, Merritt Paulson, the owner of the Portland Timbers and driving force behind the Portland bid, took his pitch to the Oregon Legislature.  Paulson is asking the Legislature to revisit a 2003 bill that would use Major League Baseball player salaries to pay for stadium construction (remember when Portland was chasing an MLB franchise?).

Giving the economic climate, Paulson wisely couched his message in terms of jobs creation.  Because his project includes the renovation of PGE Park and the construction of a new home for his minor league baseball team, Paulson can pitch his project as a two-for-one.

Action is also taking place on the city level, because Paulson is seeking funding on all fronts.  In a remarkable display of chutzpah, Paulson took his argument directly to the people, through a commentary piece in the Oregonian.  In his article, Paulson states that he is seeking $35-38 million from the City to improve PGE Park, and trumpets his willingness to pony up the $40 million franchise fee.  Of Course, it is only a few paragraphs later when he notes the need to build a new home for his baseball team.

As I have stated before, I think Portland would be a great venue for MLS.  With limited competition for sports dollars and media coverage, and a strong repuation as a hotbed for soccer, Portland seems like perfect destination for the League.  The deadline for City action is March 15.  Footiebusiness.com will keep tracking all of the expansion bids.  We of course welcome your comments on the viability of this bid as well.  mls

MLS Expansion: Portland?

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As part of an occasional series of posts on MLS expansion contenders, I thought it worth taking a look at Portland’s efforts to join the League in 2011.  The bid centers on a proposal to upgrade PGE Park, the home of a minor league baseball team and the Portland Timbers of the USL.  According to the folks at mlsportland.com, a $40 million upgrade will take PGE to MLS standards.

Interestingly, the driving force behind the Portland bid is Merritt Paulson, son of the former Secretary of the Treasury.  Paulson is seeking $85 million in public money to support the bid, renovate the stadium and construct infrastructure.  Given the economic climate, and his father’s prominent role in the bailout, there is no small irony in Paulson’s leading the charge for a raft of public money.

Soccer has been successful in the City of Roses at the USL level and as a “one sport town” Portland is an attractive market.  This is especially so, when that one sport is the NBA (with only a small amount of schedule overlap).  Using Columbus as a model, there is good reason to believe that a Portland franchise backed by big money and a solid stadium, can succeed.

The bid was recently rocked by scandal, when Portland mayor Sam Adams, a strong proponent of the bid, admitted to an inappropriate relationship with a teenage female.  With franchise announcements expected in about a month, it will be interesting to see whether the Mayor’s problems will drag down Paulson’s efforts.  Portland has long been a soccer hotbed, and with Seattle entering the League in 2009, there is great potential for a natural rivalry.

I think Portland is a great fit.  I’ve long believed that medium markets like Columbus, Salt Lake City and San Jose are perfect locations for MLS franchises. Yes you need the big cities, but in New York and Boston, MLS is barely a blip on the sports landscape.  In smaller cities, the teams are a focus of local medial and a source of community pride.

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MLS to Miami? Does South Florida deserve a second chance?

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When MLS officials announced the next round of expansion, St. Louis, Montreal and even Portland were among the favorites to land the new franchises.  Passed over in the prior round of expansion, St. Louis, lead by Attorney Jeffrey Cooper, landed a stadium deal and big name investors like Albert Pujols.  Nevertheless, MLS has long had concern about Cooper’s financial stability.

When Montreal  and Atlanta dropped out of the race (leaving Portland, Ottawa and Vancouver among the possibilities) the Gateway City seemed almost guaranteed a spot for 2011.  Then a dark horse entered the race in the form world famous F.C. Barcelona.

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The Spanish powerhouse combined with Marcelo Claure and Florida International University to     submit a bid to bring MLS back to South Florida.  As MLS fans well know, the Miami Fusion entered the League as an expansion team in 1998 and were contracted just four years later.  That background, combined with South Florida’s rather weak history of supporting its teams (Florida Marlins anyone?), has lead many to scoff at any move back to the Miami area.  Add in the lack of a Soccer Specific Stadium (the team would share with the FIU Football team) and the Miami bid seems like a sure loser.

However, the leadership of MLS seems to disagree.  Apparently wowed by the glam of FC Barcelona and the billions in Claure’s pockets, the league seems eager to embrace South Florida.  Commissioner Don Garber just announced that if the Miami bid is accepted, the team would start play in 2010, a year ahead of schedule and at the same time as Philadelphia.

Count me among the unconvinced.  The “beloved” Miami Dolphins strugle to sell out their games, the Panthers are barely a blip on the Miami scene and Marlins are an annual embarassment.  Why would MLS be any different? The idea of 9,000 fans snoozing through Sunday afternoon game in 110 degree Miami August heat, is a nightmare scenario for supporters of the Leage.   MLS may love the idea of Barca dumping money into its coffers, but like Chivas before them, I see little chance of a big time soccer power adjusting to life in Major League Soccer.  League rules will not permit “Barca USA” to serve as a farm team of the parent club or as a way station for up and coming talents.  MLS should have no interest in serving as a marketing opportunity for the Spanish Giants.  As much as Barca might love the idea of selling jerseys in North America, I think the League would be far better served  taking $40 million from St. Louis and and Portland in 2011.