A Peek Behind the Curtain: A Look Back

We are on the road on a snowy New England night so we thought we would offer up a post that has been getting a fair amount of hits lately, probably because of the CBA negotiations.  We first wrote this post in March, 2009.

Few sports leagues guard their finances more closely than MLS, but efforts to bring a franchise to Portland brought many long hidden numbers to light.  In a report prepared  by HVS, many MLS financial numbers became public for the first time.  The report is here.

The report projects MLS finances from 2011 (when Portland enters the League), until 2015 and aggregates data from past seasons.  Total  MLS stadium revenues for 2011-2015 are projected at $14-15 Million per year.  This includes ticket sales, advertising, naming rights, concessions and more.

The report also addresses season ticket sales for 2007 and 2008 with Toronto the high (16,641 in 2008) and Chivas the low (837 in 2008).  The report does not include Seattle’s 22k for 2009.  Most teams fall in the 3-5k range, but the League did show a 26% increase from 2007 to 2008 (including the addition of San Jose in 2008).

Because the report focused on the viability of a stadium in Portland, many of the numbers focus on seating, concessions, merchandise and other game day items. Around the League, Club prices range from $5,000 (both L.A. teams) to approximately $1,000.  Suites range from $154,000 per year (Galaxy) to $21,000 per year (KC).  Some teams sell suites by the game, while most offer only annual purchases.

Stadium naming rights are also discussed; The Home Depot Center is a $70 million deal for 10 years, while Pizza Hut Park is $25 million over 20 years.  Dick’s Sporting Goods Park is a $40 million two year deal and Rio Tinto is a $1.5-$2 million dollar annual deal (for 15 years)The report also projects annual ticket sales in Portland (well below the mean), ticket prices, revenue from non-soccer events and more.

This is a facinating picture of the League’s current, past and future finances. Based on these numbers, the City of Portland and presumably investors in Vancouver, Portland, Philly and St. Louis were eager to buy into MLS.  The report makes for fantastic reading (in its entirety) and will definitely make for interesting conversation.

What are your thoughts?  Are their numbers in the report that surprise you?  Impress you?  Let us know.

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